Producer Nicholas George Finds an Adopted Dog Actress has Stolen the Show From Beautiful Women and a Comedian in his Latest 2012 Super Bowl Commercial ?Good Doggie?

Producer Nicholas George Finds an Adopted Dog Actress has Stolen the Show From Beautiful Women and a Comedian in his Latest 2012 Super Bowl Commercial “Good Doggie”











De Veau Dunn visualizes the cat burglar entrance in his “Good Doggie” commercial


San Diego, CA (PRWEB) December 15, 2011

Producer Nicholas George was busy releasing the revised edition of his filmmaking book, Film Crew: Fundamentals of Professional Film and Video Production, when he got a call from Endi Entertainment director De Veau Dunn. That call would ultimately lead to the casting of an adopted rescue dog, named Sasha, which would change both of their lives forever.

De Veau informed Nicholas that production was a go on “Good Doggie”, their proposed 2012 Super Bowl commercial entry. “I immediately put out a casting call for a unique dog actor,” said George, “and when Sasha’s submission came in, De Veau and I both knew instantly that we wanted to work with her.” According to George, De Veau had been rehearsing with a cat burglar Halloween mask while creating his digital storyboards for their upcoming “Good Doggie” Super Bowl commercial. “Sasha’s eyes had these incredibly rare markings that looked much like the cat burglar mask… it was truly uncanny and quite synchronistic.”

Sasha came in for the audition and captivated the entire film crew. “It is definitely energizing to be in a room with Sasha, she has a rare charisma and star quality about her.” Sasha has already been asked to be the spokes-dog for an organization called Save a Dog Day, which is dedicated to bringing awareness to rescue dogs and their success stories as well as providing links to valuable information to those looking to adopt a dog at http://www.saveadogday.org/. The Save a Dog Day organizers have told me that their web traffic has increased dramatically since Sasha’s “Good Doggie” video and dog adoption story has been featured on their website. They also mentioned that so many animal supporters and dog rescue groups are re-tweeting Sasha’s pet adoption success story on the @SaveDogDay twitter account available via https://twitter.com/#!/SaveDogDay, animal lovers are really getting behind this angelic little underdog.

George also noted that he has personally had the life enhancing experience of taking in a rescue dog. After the “Good Doggie” video shoot wrapped, another filmmaker asked what it was like working with a dog? George replied, “Sasha was the least complex actress I’ve ever worked with. She didn’t require a private dressing room and was quite content sprawled out on the kitchen floor’s cool tile during her breaks. Then again, she did insist on a particular brand of Doggie treats between takes.”

“Good Doggie” director, De Veau Dunn, is also very passionate about dog adoption and encourages people to look into adopting a dog as a loving alternative when they are considering going out and buying a dog. When the pair co-wrote “Good Doggie”, which can be viewed at the 2012 Doritos Crash The Super Bowl website, if you search the 10 ten most viewed 2012 Super Bowl commercials, Dunn wanted to somehow get the message out to adopt a dog. With nearly 50,000 views on the Crash the Super Bowl website in under a month, “Good Doggie” has been getting a great deal of exposure, but due to time constraints the director’s cut is the only version of “Good Doggie” which includes a call to action message in support of rescue dogs in the video, this version is only available on De Veau Dunn’s YouTube channel.

George also noted receiving a surge in newsletter sign-ups on http://www.filmandvideoproduction.net, where information on his popular filmmaking book “Film Crew” is available. “I think people just want to know more about producing commercials as well as YouTube videos that can reach a large audience.” Ironically, Sasha’s performance has propelled “Good Doggie” into the spotlight. “… but knowing that Sasha being an adopted rescue dog is bringing so much awareness to the need for dog adoption, that really seems to be serving a greater good.”

###











Attachments















































Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.









Smash-hit ?Undercover Video? Reveals Untold Story of How Adopted Dogs Celebrate the Holidays

Smash-hit ‘Undercover Video’ Reveals Untold Story of How Adopted Dogs Celebrate the Holidays













Jolly Holi-dog


Kanab, UT (Vocus/PRWEB) December 16, 2010

Most holiday-minded folks labor under the faulty assumption that little elves are responsible for instigating merry magic. Not so!

Best Friends Animal Society’s undercover camera catches the real, as yet untold story of how our canine pals play a pivotal role in the annual societal phenomenon called the holidays. And since the one-minute video made its debut on You Tube a couple of weeks ago, it’s taking on a life of its own, with views multiplying by the thousands per hour.

“The Jolly Holi-dog Celebration” shows furry festive-makers decked out in holiday sweaters wrapping presents, hanging ornaments on the tree, creating holiday decorations and frosting cookies. The humorous video is part of Best Friends’ awareness campaign to promote No More Homeless Pets.

The point of the amusing, entertaining video is to encourage people to open their hearts and homes to rescued dogs and cats, with a tagline that reads: “Make a holiday wish come true for a homeless dog or cat — Adopt!”

The campaign directs people to http://home.bestfriends.org, where they can watch the Jolly Holi-dog celebration, learn more about Best Friends, and search for adoptable pets at Best Friends’ sanctuary and in their local community.

People who watch the video on their mobile device can enter to win fun pet-related prizes. The grand prize is a Sony Bloggie video camera and the winner will be encouraged to take videos of how his/her pets celebrate. To visit the page, users must enter the URL bfas.org/holidog into their mobile phone’s web browser.

“Best Friends takes the challenge of solving the homeless pet problem very seriously but there is nothing wrong with making people smile while we are getting our message across,” says Kelly Morton, senior manager of marketing for Best Friends Animal Society.

“This campaign is part of an effort to broaden Best Friends’ reach by connecting to mobile audiences. The fast-paced growth of the mobile channel will support No More Homeless Pets by allowing us to communicate with both supporters and new markets in personal, relevant ways that inspire participation and education.

“And remember that all these adoptable rescued dogs and cats want from Santa this year, as we say in another video promotion, is you.”

About Best Friends Animal Society®

Best Friends Animal Society is a nonprofit organization building no-kill programs and partnerships that will bring about a day when there are No More Homeless Pets®.The society’s leading initiatives in animal care and community programs are coordinated from its Kanab, Utah, headquarters, the country’s largest no-kill sanctuary.This work is made possible by the personal and financial support of a grassroots network of supporters and community partners across the nation.

To become a fan of Best Friends Animal Society on Facebook go to: http://www.facebook.com/bestfriendsanimalsociety

Follow Best Friends on Twitter: http://twitter.com/BFAS

###









Attachments

























Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







Possible Problems With Adopted Dogs

Possible Problems With Adopted Dogs

Most shelter dogs arrive with one or two behavior issues, and those that don’t will frequently develop some out of utter ingenuity. And the stress of changing to a whole new house and a whole new family is extremely likely to bring about new unwelcome habits or exacerbate old ones.


Remain calm, and don’t take it personally; your dog is not doing anything bizarre, unchangeable, or spiteful. She’s not misbehaving out of spite, so don’t correct her in retaliation; your intention is to stop her unfavorable behavior calmly and authoritatively, not to get revenge. Consider, she probably has never had to yield to any guidelines previously, but that doesn’t suggest she won’t want to learn yours.


We’ve made a list of the more prevalent doggie problems here, but a couple central principles apply to each of them:


1. Use prevention. If you know your dog likes to chew your socks or dig in your plants, don’t leave your belongings where she can reach them just yet. If she is only misbehaved when she’s by herself, don’t leave her alone until she is completely trained. Simply put, prevent as many problems for her to do inappropriate behaviors during these first couple of weeks. But don’t go overboard and confine her to her crate all day either; that’s not fair to her, and in addition, she won’t ever understand if she is never allowed to make mistakes.


2. No matter what, stay consistent. Set guidelines, and adhere to them. Correct your dog anytime she misbehaves, not just when you want to (and not only when you happen to catch her – which means you need to look after her every move relentlessly in the beginning). And gather the family together to ensure that everybody in the household is correcting the same situations in the same manner; don’t let anybody try to be the “nice one” by not punishing your dog’s unwanted behaviors. That won’t earn anybody points; it will just create a very bewildered and unhappy pet.


3. Catch her in the act, or don’t catch her at all. Similar to housebreaking, you must correct a mistake right as it happens, rather than forty-five minutes or nine hours later. You may scold your dog if you find her chewing on your tennis shoes, but not if you find your tennis shoes aleady torn up on the floor and can’t see your dog anywhere around. If you wait too long to make the correction, she’ll have many fantastic memories of eating your belongings and no idea that your anger has anything to do with it. She’ll simply think you are a crazy person who gets angry for no reason, and learn to fear you. Guess what that means? That’s right. Supervision.


Entrapment isn’t against the law when training your dog. Let’s say you are having difficulties catching your dog in the act of stealing food from your counters. Why not set her up? Put some irresistible tidbit where it can’t be missed, and be ready to correct her with your shake can or spray bottle and your sharp voice when she goes for the goods. Cheating? Maybe – but it’s effective. Don’t forget to tell her when she’s good. You don’t want to be a naysayer all the time; if you’ve corrected her for digging in the garden, then tell her she’s terrific when you see her resisting the urge to do so.

When getting a dog at the shelter, it would be a good idea to get ready by shopping for some high end items like dog beds on sale – obtain the best prices on rare doggie gear at http://www.ohmydogsupplies.com

Potty Training An Adopted Dog

Potty Training An Adopted Dog

Adopting a new puppy is one of the things that bring delight and squeals from children. It is a happy occasion for both you and the family. However, a puppy, cute and squiggly as they are will, as all dogs do, mess the house. The new member of the household has to be potty trained as soon as the first day.

It is important to note that dogs could hold their bladder up to five hours, not more than that. In fact, dogs being territorial animals will mark the territory by urinating every few feet or so. When the dog is new to a particular place that has not yet been marked by other dogs, expect the dog itching to mark every nook and cranny of the house, worse, that include the rugs and carpets. The following will walk you through to potty train the pup.

Because you are expecting the pup to urinate you could very well anticipate that it is bound to happen. Once you see a pup raising a hind leg, carry him outside to a designated place where the pup could relieve himself. Typically a pup that is good for adoption is about three months old. That also means that the puppy could hold his bladder for at least three hours. Refrain from waiting for that. Bring the puppy out every two hours counting from the time when you first brought him outside. It is important to establish a routine and a schedule. Dogs respond well to schedule and routine. Routines, repetitions, and schedules are the main tools used in training.

Use the same area each time. When you are trough playing with the puppy, go to the spot. When the puppy has finished eating, go to the spot. Every two hours after that, go to the same spot. Sooner or later, the puppy will get the idea. All it takes is patience and how ready you are because bringing home a new dog to the house will take responsibility. The hardest part is just until the puppy gets used to the routine. Until then, everything hangs on your commitment to raising a housebroken dog.

Likewise, feed the dog on a regular schedule. That way you could predict and better control the time when the puppy will be relieving itself.

In the same manner, young puppies will need to relieve itself during the night. A young puppy is generally regarded as less than four months old. If so, do give water to the puppy before bedtime. Puppies that are four months or more make it overnight. When the puppy wakes up, the first urge is to urinate, bring him to the spot. After a nap, do the same. Establishing routines and getting the puppy accustomed to the spot will make him go there eventually without being led.

Even behind all these, accidents could happen. If the pup soiled a rug, a piece of paper or pieces of item, place the items in the spot. It will give the puppy the hint what the spot is for.

It is also important to praise the puppy the very moment after the puppy has relived himself in the spot designated. That will reinforce the idea and go there every time.

Black Dogs are the last to be adopted and the first to be euthanized. Adopt A Black Dog Today!
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Building A Doghouse For Your Newly Adopted Dog

Building A Doghouse For Your Newly Adopted Dog

Once deciding on adopting a dog, the next step to consider is the kind of doghouse that you’ll need. The doghouse is dependent upon the dog breed that you get. Dogs grow extremely fast and considerations must be taken to insure that the doghouse will shelter your dog when it is full-grown.

The Kind of Doghouse

This is the fine time to practice creativity. There are countless doghouse styles as you can find houses for people. For people that need to exercise fun and creativity, doghouse styles could possibly be constructed to look like a miniature single room white house complete with a blue room or just have the blue room instead. It could even look like the essential structure of your house with the inside looking like your living area. It might be constructed to look like a chalet, a lean to, a box or a cage. You can find a lot of choices. The only must is how the doghouse will fit the dog enough to have him move comfortably and the roof will not be so hot during summer months. Another very important item is a door. In areas where you will find very cold seasons, a door needs to be opted instead of the usual open hole.

Determining the Size

Determining doghouse sizes are personal choices. You can build the doghouse as big as you want. However, you cannot build a doghouse smaller than this:

Height: to find out a comfortable height that is also enough to insure good air circulation, add 9 inches to the height of a fully-grown dog of the same breed.

Length: to find out the shortest length for a doghouse, add one and one half foot from the length of your dog starting from the tip of the nose to its rump.

Width: to decide the narrowest width of the doghouse that would provide enough space for the dog to move around, add one foot to the length of the dog, this is the narrowest space for your width.

Choosing the Doghouse Location

The optimal area to be chosen as the location for building the dog house is a level ground that is free from water run-off. Clear the site where the doghouse will be built down to the short grass. Pack the ground tightly before building. In areas where there are extreme changes in weather, you may need to insulate the doghouse or consider air conditioning. This is more important when you have an outdoor dog breed. You will find many choices for roofing but often, a wooden roof is sufficiently cool. For flooring you may want vinyl or lumber as these are easily cleaned.

For health reasons, the doghouse is usually constructed a few inches from the ground. This also wards off insects and other small animals from entering aside from insuring the place remains dry. Then you begin building.

When pressed for time and you would prefer doghouse kits, you can find so many varieties that are available that are pre-fabricated and are available in your local pet shops.

Read more about successfully adopting a dog, and download your copy of Adopting A Dog – The Secret to A Successful Adoption now!

Find More Adopt Dog Articles

Paper Training An Adopted Dog

Paper Training An Adopted Dog

Adopting a new puppy is without doubt one of the things that bring delight and squeals from children. It is a happy occasion for both you and the family. However, a puppy, cute and cuddly as they are will, as all dogs do, mess in the home. The newest member of the household has to be potty trained as soon as the very first day.

You should note that dogs could hold their bladder up to five hours, not more than that. In fact, dogs being territorial animals will mark the territory by urinating every few feet or so. When your dog is new to a particular place that has not yet been marked by other dogs, expect your dog itching to mark every nook and cranny of the house, worse, that includes the rugs and carpets. The following will take you step-by-step through to potty train the pup.

Since you are expecting the pup to urinate you would likely anticipate that it is bound to happen. Once you see a pup raising a hind leg, carry him outside to a designated place where the pup could relieve himself. Typically a pup that is good for adoption is about three months old. That also means that the puppy could hold his bladder for at least three hours. Refrain from waiting for that. Bring the puppy out every two hours counting from the time when you first brought him outside. You will need to establish a routine and a schedule. Dogs respond well to schedule and routine. Routines, repetitions, and schedules are the main tools used in training.

Use the same area each time. When you are trough playing with the puppy, go to the spot. When the puppy has finished eating, go to the spot. Every two hours after that, go to the same spot. Sooner or later, the puppy will get the idea. All it takes is patience and how ready you are because bringing home a new dog to the house will take responsibility. The hardest part is just until the puppy gets used to the routine. Until then, everything hangs on your commitment to raising a housebroken dog.

Likewise, feed your dog on a regular schedule. That way you could predict and better control the time when the puppy will be relieving itself.

In the same manner, young puppies will need to relieve itself during the night. A young puppy is generally regarded as less than four months old. If so, do give water to the puppy before bedtime. Puppies that are four months or more make it overnight. When the puppy wakes up, the initial urge is to urinate, bring him to the spot. After a nap, do the same. Establishing routines and getting the puppy accustomed to the spot will make him go there eventually without being led.

Even behind all these, accidents could happen. If the pup soiled a rug, a piece of paper or pieces of item, place the items in the spot. It will give the puppy the hint what the spot is for.

It is also important to praise the puppy the very moment after the puppy has relived himself in the spot designated. That will reinforce the idea and go there every time.

Read more about successfully adopting a dog, and download your copy of Adopting A Dog – The Secret to A Successful Adoption now!

UPDATE: Jumping Jack was adopted right before Christmas in New York! But we have more dogs available. Tangi Adopt A Rescue – www.petfinder.com – Hi! I am named Jumping Jack and I am a playful pup that is about 10-12 pounds I will not get any larger fatter maybe if you fall for my cute tricks and reward me with too many dog cookies! I am incredibly sweet. I am crate trained, housetrained, and I walk on a lead rather well. I will whine when I need to go out and potty. I sleep at night in my crate. I get along well with people, children, dogs, and cats (if they are not slapping me). I like to dog toys to chew on and prefer the stuffed one that I can de-head and mangle. Still feeling like a puppy and could be destructive if home alone – supervised and giving many doggy toys I would be a great house pet. I will cuddle on the couch with you and fall to sleep. I play kinda ruff I am a terrier and must be supervised with small children. I am sometime talkative (some say am demanding) when I want a toy, treat or attention and need a strong pack leader that will take command. I will not mind much as I am very smart and learn quickly with food as a motivator food hound. I know – SIT, JUMP, SHAKE hands, and DOWN, and of course I ready to learn more. I am not looking to be adopted by someone looking for a yard dog – I want time inside with my family! I’m one of the 9 survivors of the mass killing at the Hammond shelter on Aug 4, 2008. More info here: Photos of the only TPAC survivors